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How many Aussies are living with a shopaholic partner?

A Money.com.au Study  

April 2023

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About the study

Money.com.au surveyed 1010 Australians to gauge whether they believe their partner spends too much on non-essential items or services, and how this might impact their own financial profile. Out of the respondents, 841 stated that they have a partner.

The pool of survey respondents matches the age and geographical spread of the Australian population. 

Questions

1

3

2

4

1

2

3

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How many Australians share a bank account or credit card with their partner?

Money.com.au asked survey respondents whether they share a bank account or credit card with their partner.

The survey found that the majority of respondents who have a partner said that they share a bank account or credit card with their partner. Specifically:

  • 43% said yes
  • 40% said no
  • 17% stated that they do not have a partner

Importantly, if you have a joint credit card with a partner, missed payments or defaults caused by their overspending could impact your credit score as well as theirs. This, in turn, could impact your ability to access credit in future, including when making a home loan application.

Do you share a bank account or credit card with your partner?

Do you share a bank account or credit card with your partner?

Half of 31-50-year-old respondents and almost half (47 per cent) of over-50s in a partnership share a bank account or credit card with their significant other. This compares to only 36 per cent of 18–30-year-olds.

Do you share a bank account or credit card with your partner? By age.

Do you share a bank account or credit card with your partner? By age.

Across the states, West Australians and South Australians in partnerships are more likely to share a bank account or credit card with their partner (49 per cent and 48 per cent said yes) than other States. This is followed by:

  • 44% of Victorians
  • 42% of NSW respondents
  • 41% of Queenslanders

Specifically, respondents in NSW are more likely to have separate bank accounts or credit cards from their partner’s (chosen by 44 per cent). This compares with:

  • 38% of Victorians
  • 38% of Queenslanders
  • 38% of South Australians
  • 36% of West Australians

Do you share a bank account or credit card with your partner? By State.

Do you share a bank account or credit card with your partner? By State.

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services?

Among the respondents who do have partners, over a quarter (26 per cent) believe their partner spends too much on non-essential items or services. The rest indicated that their partner doesn’t overdo their discretionary spending.

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services?

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services?

Across the age groups, the survey found that younger Aussies are more likely to believe their partner is spending too much on non-essential items or services compared. Specifically:

  • 35% of 18–30-year-olds
  • 33% of 31–50-year-olds
  • 15% of over-50s

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services? By age

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services? Bye age

In a comparison of the States, South Australian respondents are more likely to believe that their partners are spending too much on non-essentials (chosen by 30 per cent), followed by:

  • 29% of Victorians
  • 25% of NSW respondents
  • 25% of West Australians
  • 24% of Queenslanders

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services? By State.

Does your partner spend too much on non-essential items or services? Bye State.

How much do Australians believe their partner spends a month that they think is wasteful?

Money.com.au asked respondents how much their partner spends per month that they believe is wasteful. The survey found that:

  • for 14% of respondents, it’s less than $100/month
  • for 28%, it’s $100-200/month
  • for 21%, it’s $200-300/month
  • for 31%, it’s $300-600/month
  • for 9%, it’s more than $600/month

How much does your partner spend a month that you believe is wasteful?

How much does your partner spend a month that you believe is wasteful?

Across the genders, men are most likely to believe that their partner’s monthly spending of $100-200 is wasteful – chosen by 33 per cent of male respondents - compared with only 24 per cent of female respondents. Specifically, male respondents believe their partners spend wastefully at the following levels:

  • 14% say less than $100/month
  • 20% say $200-$300/month
  • 12% say $300-$400/month
  • 19% say $400-$600/month
  • 3% $600-$800/month
  • 0% say over $800/month

How much does your partner spend a month that you believe is wasteful? By gender.

How much does your partner spend a month that you believe is wasteful? By gender.

Female respondents are more likely to report that their partner’s wasteful spending at over $600/month. Specifically:

  • 13% say their partner spend less than $100/month wastefully
  • 24% say $100-$200/month
  • 22% say $200-$300/month
  • 30% say $300-$600/month
  • 11% say over $600/month

An analysis across the age groups found a quarter of respondents aged 18-30 say that their partner’s wasteful spending is at around $400-600 each month. This compares with:

  • 7% of 31-50-year-olds
  • 6% of over-50s

How much does your partner spend a month that you believe is wasteful? By age.

How much does your partner spend a month that you believe is wasteful? By age.

The survey reveals that almost a quarter (24 per cent) of NSW respondents believe that their partner spends $400-600/month wastefully. This compares with:

  • 19% of Victorians
  • 11% of Queenslanders
  • 0% of South Australians
  • 17% of West Australians

Over half (53 per cent) of South Australian respondents revealed their partner’s wasteful spending is between $100-$200/month. This compares with:

  • 26% of NSW and Victorian respondents
  • 32% of Queenslanders
  • 22% of West Australians

Interestingly, nine per cent of West Australians stated their partner spends over $1000/month wastefully. This compares with:

  • 0% of Victorian respondents
  • 0% of Queensland respondents
  • 0% of South Australian respondents
  • 1% of NSW respondents

How much do Australians believe their partner spends a month that they think is wasteful? By State.

ResponseNSW (%)VIC (%)QLD (%)SA (%)WA (%)

Less than $100/month

13

5

24

16

17

$100-200/month

26

26

32

53

22

$200-300/month

20

24

16

21

17

$300-400/month

7

21

11

11

13

$400-600/month

24

19

11

0

17

$600-800/month

6

3

5

0

0

$800-1000/month

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2

0

0

4

More than $1000

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0

0

0

9

In 2022, how many Aussies and/or their partners struggled to meet essential expenses?

Money.com.au asked respondents whether or not they and/or their partners struggled to meet essential expenses in 2022, including personal, household or car expenses. Money.com.au found a 50/50 split between respondents.

In 2022, have you and/or your partner struggled to meet essential expenses (personal, household, car etc)?

In 2022, have you and/or your partner struggled to meet essential expenses (personal, household, car etc)?

Among the respondents who stated that either they or their partner have struggled to meet essential expenses, 56 per cent are female and 44 per cent are male.

Respondents who have struggled to meet essential expenses. By gender.

Respondents who have struggled to meet essential expenses. By gender.

A higher proportion of younger respondents struggled to meet essential expenses. Specifically:

  • 57% of 18–30-year-olds
  • 52% of 31-50-year-olds

In 2022, have you and/or your partner struggled to meet essential expenses (personal, household, car etc)? By age.

In 2022, have you and/or your partner struggled to meet essential expenses (personal, household, car etc)? By age.

Across the States, respondents in NSW found the greatest struggle when it came to meeting essential expenses (chosen by 64 per cent). In comparison, South Australian respondents were least likely to struggle to meet essential expenses in 2022. Across the rest of the States:

  • 45% of Victorians struggled to meet essential expenses in 2022
  • 46% of Queenslanders struggled to meet essential expenses in 2022
  • 39% of West Australians struggled to meet essential expenses in 2022

In 2022, have you and/or your partner struggled to meet essential expenses (personal, household, car etc)? By State.

In 2022, have you and/or your partner struggled to meet essential expenses (personal, household, car etc)? By State.
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