Capital Gains Tax Calculator

Use our capital gains tax calculator to find out whether you will have to pay CGT, and how much it could cost you.

  • Take Home Pay
    Capital Gains Amount $0
  • Super savings
    Taxable Capital Gains Amount $0
  • Total Taxes
    Capital Gains Tax Amount $0
  • Super savings
    Net Remaining Capital Gains $0

Breakdown 55

Weekly Fortnightly Monthly Annually
Taxable Income $0 $0 $0 $0
Super 1 $0 $0 $0 $0
Income Tax $0 $0 $0 $0
Medicare Levy 2 $0 $0 $0 $0
Medicare Levy Surcharge 3 $0 $0 $0 $0
HELP/SSL/TLS Repayment $0 $0 $0 $0
SFSS Repayment $0 $0 $0 $0
STSL Repayment $0 $0 $0 $0
SAPTO $0 $0 $0 $0
Tax Offsets 4 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Tax $0 $0 $0 $0
Take Home Pay $0 $0 $0 $0
1 This is the amount your employer pays into your superannuation account. It's your money (for when you retire) and you do not need to pay tax on it.
2 Medicare gives Australian residents access to health care. It's partly funded by the Medicare Levy, which is 2% of your taxable income. You pay a Medicare Levy in addition to the income tax you pay on your taxable income.
3 Medicare Levy Surcharge (MLS) is levied on Australian taxpayers who don't have an appropriate level of private hospital insurance and who earn above a certain income threshold.
4 Depending on your income, you may be entitled to the new low and middle income tax offset, weekly, fortnightly, monthly figures are estimates.

Learn more about how the Capital Gains Tax Calculator works




How to use the Capital Gains Tax calculator


To use the Capital Gains Tax calculator, you’ll need to enter some details about your asset. These are explained below:

  • Purchase Price - How much you purchased the asset for.
  • Length of Ownership - Whether you have owned the asset for less than 12 months or longer than 12 months.
  • Sold Price - How much you have sold the asset for.
  • Current Taxable Income - Your current taxable income. This will help determine the tax rate at which the capital gain on your asset will be taxed. It's important to note that any capital gains amount will be added to your current income before calculating the tax rate - i.e. a capital gains amount could force you into a higher tax bracket.
  • Total Costs of Purchasing, Owning and Selling the Asset - This is the amount you have personally invested into the asset before sale. For example, if your asset is a property, this may include marketing for sale or renovations, which will be used to calculate your final capital gains amount.

Once you have entered the details about the asset and your income, you can click Calculate to see how much you will need to pay in Capital Gains Tax.


Capital Gains Tax Example Calculation


For this example we’ll look at how Capital Gains Tax works if you own shares. You’ve bought shares and have they have increased in value. You are now selling your shares and need to calculate your CGT. Capital Gains Tax is calculated at either 100% of the capital gains amount or 50% of the capital gains amount, depending on the length of time you have owned the asset.


If you hold the shares for less than 12 months


You will pay tax on the full amount of profit. This is the amount you have made on top of your initial investment (earnings). Every dollar you have made in earnings will be taxed at your individual income tax rate.


For example:

  • Your salary is $100,000 per year
  • Your income tax bracket is 37% - ($90,001 – $180,000)
  • You make a $10,000 capital gain on shares you own for less than 12 months
  • You sell the shares and 100% of the $10,000 capital gain is taxed at 37%
  • You will pay a CGT amount of $3,700 on the shares
  • You are left with $6,300 from the capital gain on your shares

If you hold the shares for more than 12 months


If you own the shares for longer than 12 months, the ATO (Australian Tax Office) gives you a 50% discount on your capital gains tax. This means that you only pay tax on 50% of your earnings from the asset.


For example:

  • You salary is $100,000 per year
  • Your income tax bracket is 37% - ($90,001 – $180,000)
  • You make a $10,000 capital gain on shares you own for more than 12 months
  • You sell the shares and 50% of the $10,000 capital gain is taxed at 37%
  • You will pay a CGT amount of $1,850 on the shares
  • You are left with $8,150 from the capital gain on your shares

If you want to quickly calculate the amount of tax you’ll have to pay any asset, you can use our free Capital Gains Tax calculator.


Other Money.com.au Calculators


Calculated your Capital Gains Tax and want to work out other finance calculations? We have a range of Money.com.au calculators for almost any situation - you can visit our dedicated page to view the full list of financial calculators. You can use these calculators to estimate your tax return, car loan repayments, compound interest, and much more.



Capital Gains Tax Calculator FAQs

A capital gain or loss is the amount of money you make or lose on the sale of an asset. The capital difference is how much you purchase the asset for versus how much you sell it for.

The amount of CGT you will pay on your shares can vary depending on how long you have held the investment. If you own the asset for less than 12 months, you will have to pay 100% of the capital gain at your income tax rate. If you own the asset for longer than 12 months, you will pay 50% of the capital gain. Capital gains are taxed at the same rate as taxable income - i.e. if you earn $40,000 (32.5% tax bracket) per year and make a capital gain of $60,000, you will pay income tax for $100,000 (37% income tax) and your capital gains will be taxed at 37%.

The quickest way to determine if you need to pay CGT on your shares is to see if your shares have made money over the time since you bought them. If you are selling shares at a price below what you paid for them, you have made a loss and you do not need to worry about capital gains tax. If the price of your shares has risen since buying and you are now selling; you will have to pay CGT.

Any asset you have purchased or acquired since Capital Gains Tax was first introduced - 20 September 1985 - will be subject to Capital Gains Tax, with some exceptions for personal-use assets such as the family home or your personal vehicle:

CGT assets CGT-exempt assets
  • Real estate
  • Shares or similar investments
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Leases, Licences, Foreign currency
  • Collectables and personal use assets above $10,000
  • Your family home
  • A personal vehicle
  • Depreciating assets used solely for taxable purposes, such as business equipment
  • Any asset acquired before 20 September 1985